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from war? word patriot missiles are headed to the border between our ally turkey and syria. warning for syria's president. our concerns is increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons. chemical weapons against his own people and president obama has said if that happens, there will be consequences. tonight, the concerns and the reality inside syria. this military man lost custody of his little girl when his foreign wife divorced him and left the country. >> i just literally had about 20 minutes to say goodbye to my daughter. >> harris: now, the supreme court taking a case that could mean a lot for military families. plus, dogs, learning how to drive cars. shifting. >> good boy. >> steering. >> good. >> accelerating. cats of the world consider yourselves warned. i'm harris faulkner in tonight for shepard smith. we are learning u.s. forces could soon be headed to the syrian border. their mission part of nato's plan to put patriot missiles at the line between turkey and syria. those patriots are designed to intercept any potential missiles coming from syria. and de
for syria made a proposal in damascus where he is delivering talks. >> he will also be holding discussions in moscow as russia steps up its role in helping to find a political resolution to the conflict. the russian parliament says time is running out for damascus. >> it was a high-level meeting between syrian diplomats and the russian foreign minister. he made moscow's line clear -- the crisis has to be solved through political dialogue between the warring parties, but there was no mention of any new proposals to bring about that objective. the foreign ministry denied reports of a new peace plan from russia and the u.s. >> this plan does not exist. that is why it is not being discussed. with mr. brahimi and our american colleagues, we are trying to find a solution on the basis of the peace plan that was agreed upon in june. >> the geneva agreement calls for a cease-fire and the creation of a traditional government, something the united nations special envoy still wants to see. in damascus, he appealed for a government of national unity. >> this government would lead the country in a trans
an invasion of the golan heights and the east banks of the suez by syria and egypt. the surprise attacks came early this morning in the air and on the ground. >> surprise attacks. in october 1973, as richard nixon is crumbling beneath the weight of watergate, our ally israel is simultaneously surprise attacked by egypt from the west and by syria from the north. after initially being caught off guard by the attacks, israel eventually takes the upper hand. they are not only able to defend their own borders. they go on offense. they drive to within 65 miles of cairo and just 25 miles of the syrian capital of damascus. israel is on the move. and then something extraordinary happens. for the first time since the cuban missile crisis in the 1960s the united states military moves to defcon 3. for some perspective, the only other time we have been at defcon 3 since then is on 9/11. this is something that almost never happens. and when it does, it is historic and it is historically scary. and when it happened in 1973, the order to go to defcon three was not issued by president nixon. he was apparently
. >> this will be revisited next week. when we come back, trouble hot spots. syria and egypt. >>> issue two. syrian nightmare. >> i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command. the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> president obama this week warned the president of syria, bashar al-assad not to use syria's chemical weapons against his own people. rebel syrians are waging an offensive against other syrians, largely assad's government forces. unnamed u.s. officials say that syria has even gone so far as to load the precursor ingredients of sarin, a deadly nerve gas, into the aerial bombs. whether this activity is to protect the chemicals from advancing rebel forces, or for assad to actually use them against rebel forces, is not clear. as secretary of state hillary clinton points out. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons or might lose control of them to one o
, a discussion about the ongoing civil war in syria. that hearing a military conflict. then a panel on housing assistance to low-income renters. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", a look at whether medicare and social security should be part of negotiations on fiscal cliff. we will talk with john larson on how house democrats take on the issue and stephen ola and christina martin and david john of the heritage foundation, on the long-term solvency of social security. "washington journal" is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most americans were. >> it was designed for appellate, but americans were having a pellets. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large or are of the awe-inspiring nature. to . >> "new york times" critic kitty goldberg gathered photographs in history on sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on c-span3 american history tv. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognizes the main syrian opposition group as the legitimate represe
be the worst day of bloodshed syria has suffered in almost 200 days of war. and syria is bracing for more violence today. international efforts to restore peace are continuing, but are they having any success? let's go to cnn's mohammed jamjoom. yesterday was the deadliest day since january of last year. claims of a mass execution coming out. tell me more about it. >> that's right, alison, opposition activists reporting at least 397 people killed yesterday. that's a staggering number, even by the standards in syria where these days routinely we're hearing that well over 100 people a day were killed because of the fighting there. what we're hearing, the reports that are emerging that in hums province that at least 200 people were killed after regime forces retook a city from the rebel free syrian army forces. now, one activist told us that they got some of their information from a captured syrian soldier that told them that many people had been rounded up. that they had been taking to a petro chemical plant there and executed. we're still trying to get more details about this. the syrian g
, secretary panetta, since president obama made a statement about syria and chemical weapons again and secretary clinton did, we understand the red line, but the world this week certainly growing concern about syria's potential use of chemical weapons. can we ask you your view on this, how concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential response, a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. the whole world is watching. the whole world's watching very closely. the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cons qenszs. -- consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their open people. i'm not going to s
in syria. 40,000 people dead. almost two years into a civil war. no real end in sight. the obama administration has a clear policy of avoiding intervention. what do you think should be done more in syria? >> syria is a complex issue. i was the author of the syrian accountability act, which passed both houses of congress and signed by president bush in 2004, slapping sanctions on syria for the first time ever. we knew in 1979 that syria was an aider and abetter of the assad regime. it put sanctions on syria for doing all these horrendous things, including supporting terrorism, for occupying lebanon, and other things. assad is a bad guy. his father was a bad guy. the assad dictatorship has ruled for 40 years. the have been ruthless in their power. they are iran's main ally in the region. i think it would be a blow to iran if the regime were to fall. we are very cautious. we do not want to get involved in any more wars. think it is enough. i do think there are a lot of things we could be and should be doing to help the opposition and syria. >> such as? >> we are finally recognizing
into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: w
on the "today" show, fife days after being kidnapped and held in captivity in syria. just hours before this shot of them this morning, they were freed by a syrian rebel group who rescued them from an unknown group that had taken them and that had held them for five, long, horrible days. the rebel group not only rescued these three, they then took responsibility for driving them to the border and getting them safely out of syria. they were in syria in the first place to cover the war there. this is footage of richard's last piece for nbc news before the kidnapping happened. richard and his team are veterans in this field. they've been working together for a decade in just about every corner of the world you can imagine, including long stints covering the war in iraq. also the war in afghanistan. when they filed this report last week from aleppo in syria, they reported that conditions were about as bad as you can imagine. bread lines, no medicine, a bombed out hospital, and a lot of very, very desperate civilians in syria's largest city. it was after filing that devastating report that richard eng
a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> reporter: they are trying to push forward and march towards the presidential palace. it's a risky move that could cause conflict of supporters of mohammed morsi. the riot police seem to have the protestors bottled up in the square. the goal to march on the presidential palace failed today for the opposition. jenna: the question is whether we are headed toward potentially more violence in the streets. we'll keep an eye on what is happening in the streets today. jon: high levels of a deadly gas forced the evacuation of an elementary school forcing dozen of stud
we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the only parents she ever knew because of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with us. it was supposed to be just for laughs. humor. the listeners with a lighthearted prank. two radio deejays called the london hospital where the duchess of cambridge was being treated and tricked a nurse to get details about her condition. two days later, that nurse, 46-year-old jacintha saldanha, took her own life. leaving behind a husband and two children. and now the deejays who played the prank are off the air. >> they have mutually decided that this show will not return until further notice out of res
to the syrians after the fall of the regime, because syria is not like libya. libya, at least the had resources, their own resources sources. syria has nothing except human beings. syria, the capital is one of the old as capitals in the world. this is why if syria -- they need international support. the only way to invest in syria in the future, by building strong internationally. build a strong the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen
diplomatic efforts to end seer -- syria's bloody civil war and the fear assad could use chemical weapons against his own people. the military is prepared to use poisen gas bombs, secretary of hillary clinton flew to dublin to hold a meeting with her russian counter part and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and today, a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequ
:00 out west. thanks for starting your day with us. we start with syria and a plan for dealing with the country's chemical weapons. president obama has threatened action if chemical weapons are used, and now we have learned that the pentagon is updating military options for the president. we'll have more on the president's red line and the military options in about ten minutes. >>> belize will have to wait a little longer to question former internet mogul john mcafee about his neighbor's murder. a judge in guatemala says mcafee can remain in the country until his immigration case is heard in court. well, that could take another month. mac afee is recovering after be a apparent collapse. he had been on the run for weeks but insists he has nothing to do with his neighbor's death. >>> charlie crist announced friday on twitter he's officially a democrat. crist spoke at the democratic national convention in september as an independent. he ran for the u.s. senate two years ago as an independent but lost to marco rubio and served as governor of florida as a republican. sum are specula
again. in jordan, all the suspects have moved in and out of syria where weapons and jihadist fighters are plentiful, another sign the syrian civil war is spilling over into jordan, where the u.s. has a large stake in the survival of that government. >> to put it mildly, jordan is one of america's closest allies in that part of the world. if anything were to happen to that government, to that regime, to the kingdom there, that would be a huge loss for the u.s. >> reporter: absolutely it would. analysts say the jordanian intelligence service is one of the best in the entire region. it works very closely with u.s. intelligence to share information on terrorist cells there. if that government falls, a lot of that is compromised or lost. a huge loss for america's assets in that region. >> brian todd, thanks very much. let's get some perspective now from the jordanian foreign minister, nasser judeh. thanks for coming in. how close was al qaeda to blowing up, destroying the u.s. embassy in amman? >> they had just moved into operational phase when they thwarted that attempt. we had been monit
at recent developments on the ground in syria. host: thanks for being with us. have we turned a corner with regards to the situation in syria? caller: it seems to me it is an important juncture, perhaps a crossroads. turning a corner might be going a bit far. president assad still has substantial military capabilities, quite a bit of support. he still has control of the capital. it is a little bit hard to say. clearly the risk and an upswing on the rebel side. -- there has been an upswing on the rebel side. i think there is momentum in favor of the rebels, but this still seems to be a conflict that can go on for a long time. host: if the regime fails, it president assad is forced out, who takes his place? caller: i think that is a major concern on all fronts. there is a great fear there could be anarchy and chaos. people in syria are well aware of what happened in neighboring iraq. there is a large number of people who are not necessarily tied to the government but are extremely frightened that there could be a bloodletting that was seen in neighboring iraq. host: your in beirut. you a
to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the government of syria appears to be losing the confidence of its most important factor. russia's envoy for medalist affairs says the rebels are gaining control -- envoy for middle east affairs says the rebels are gaining control. washington congratulated the kremlin for waking up to reality. >> the aftermath of a bombing in a damascus suburb. syrian official media said a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in this district to the southwest of the total, and that at least half of the casualties were women and children. "we were going to school when the explosion took place. i do not know anything about my parents. they may have died." this man says the victims were all students, or going to their places of work. after the explosion, the ground was full of bodies. the state news agency has blamed the violence on terrorists, its name for the rebels intensifying attacks on the government. this was the latest in a string of bombings in and around damascus. for the first time, russia has acknowledged the possibility of
and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and toda a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future the pressure against the regime in and aroundamascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuinghe sharpest warning yet. >> the president of t united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou: neither the white house or pentagon elaborating on what the cons -- consequences would be, but having russia back them uld be a determined outcome made by the promise of pres
. >>shepard: explosive but unconfirmed allegations from snowed syria today. the activists are saying the assad regime has already used some of the chemical weapons. that is according to the reporting of the arab news site. the state department spokeswoman cannot confirm it. syrian activists posted video on the interpret claiming to show destruction caused by the chemical weapons. we cannot confirm that. over the weekend the regime told the u.n. it would not use those weapons on civilians. officials say syria is suspected of having the third largest stockpile of chemical weapons after the united states and russia. the situation is just one topic being discussed by world leaders and a meeting of the foreign ministers, 40,000 men and women and children have recorded killed in syria during uprising. now, live from washington. are the united states officials commenting that the government has used the chemical weapons? >>reporter: reporters were told they do not have evidence of this but video uploaded by the syrian opposition and impossible to independently verify by fox, claims to show the use of
. see you tomorrow. ♪ ♪ >> doug: the violence in syria reaches fever pitch as assad deals with a major defection. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> doug: good evening. i'm doug mckelway in for bret baier. christmas did not bring peace to syria. death toll rises each day with the estimates as high as 4,000 lives lost. president bashar assad struggled to hold on to power, the regime is still dealing with a major defection by a top general. leland vittert has the developments. >> reporter: continues to use helicopter and fighter jets at will. rebels now have the momentum. the amateur video confirmed shows the rebels fighting for back of the pickup trucks and turned in to machine gun carriers and they tighten it on the base. the less equip rebels fighting for whatever fire power they can find or build. this is a school that has been taken over by the assad thugs explained this rebel. before launching a homemade rocket from nearby building. other videos from around the country show free syrian army fighters using the same crude weapon. however, turning citizens to seasonals with little o
a great day. the news begins anew on stub with -- on "studio b" with violence in syria sparking new threats of global proportion. the deadly chemical weapons are on the move. new developments this afternoon, and we have team coverage on signs that the region could get swept in the chaos. >> and the murder-suicide in the nfl, with the rising star's final words were of great interest to investigators and what the teammates and coaches knew of his troubled at home which were many. >> super storm sandy took out homes, took out their homes, but it can't take their christmas. the blue angels giving the smallest victim as big reason to smile. well show you unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." but first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, new signs today that crisis in syria could spiral into a global conflict. today, nato joined the world powers with stern warning of threats of possible intervention coming today amid u.s. intelligence reports that they have moved dangerous chemical weapons. the sources say it involved movement in weapon sites, the teach activity they
until that date occurs. >>trace: investigators say syria could have thousands of chemical agents including cyanide and the deadly nerve gas. 40,000 people have died so far in the syrian civil war. now the fighting has spilled into neighboring lebanon, a nation where tens of thousands of syrians have sought refuge. officials in a northern city reported at least six people have died and more than 50 have been wounded in two days of violence. jonathan hunt is live today at the united nations. the big question is, will president assad stay and fight? will he seek asylum? >>jonathan: the turks and russians, they are saying they are working on what they call "new ideas to bring an end to the ongoing 20--month-old civil war." they have nut given any ideas or details what those ideas might be but it will revolve around whether president assad has decided he going to live and die in syria and die most likely at the hands of the rebels or whether he can be persuaded to say asylum but that has the u.n. secretary-general having misgivings giving a man who has murdered 40,000 of his own peopl
.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments based on intelligence any more than that. megyn: conor powell covering syria life from our mideast bureau tod
and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
and saying no to bad things, but we need to do more than that gwen: abroad, tensions in syria on the rise. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corpo
come back in some way. you cannot prove that. >> syria -- how did the united states the government, the administration handled syria perfectly, and appropriately enough, not enough? >> the good d thing about the afghanistan aniraq wars is that they are keeping us out of syria. if it were not for those, i think we would be there. >> syria could become a saster. this is a country y with a huge stockpile of chemical weapons which are pretty active. we have allowed the saudis and qatari to arm the rebels and they are the people who farmed the islamists, sohey now have the upper hand among the rebels. -- arm the islamts. the west did not do anything comparable with the non-islamist opposition. we are looking at the possie country that would dide into three or four like yugoslavia or could become the hottest and syria is a serious country. it is not libyaya or ahanistan. -- or could become jihadist. >> a molithic opposition inn syria d thfact t that there are opponents of that regime that we would not be associaiated with either. there are some radicals. that is the difficulty there. >>
with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the i
's in even more turmoil than first term. what would you do about syria right now? >> the big problem here is radical islam and the president's refusal to address the issue. the president -- here's a president that ran on women's issues and we have egypt imposing sharia law and you don't hear a word. women have to have head coverings and have no rights and you don't hear the president condemn sharia or radical islam or haven't heard him talk about the problems that are now coming up with muslim brotherhood in control of egypt, in libya and we see obviously elements of muslim brotherhood as part of the syrian lives. you see it going on in jordan. this neighborhood for israel is getting uncomfortable. used to be surrounding israel were some some cases with the exception of jordan, either cool pieces or hostile in the case of syria and lebanon. but they were controlled by basically nonreligious dictators. now we have dictators as you're seeing more doing in egypt, dictating a new constitution. but now you have sharia law and radical islamists who have a thee logical reason to go after the sta
with the multibillion-dollar tab. >>> syria's regime now loading bombs with sarin gas? is this ready to blow through the u.s.'s so-called red line? details on this story coming up. do you ever have too much money? melissa: so in case you hadn't heard we could look at another government bailout for possibly billions of dollars. housing secretary sean donovan on the hot seat today testifying in front of the senate banking committee how he hopes to avoid a bailout for the federal housing authority. our peter barnes has the latest. peter. >> hey, melissa. republicans charged that a treasury bailout of the fha is coming and the housing secretary could not rule it out. donovan said that washington is closer to one after the latest audit of the fha found it has a capital reserve deficit of about $16 billion. but the administration says it's too soon to say whether the fha will need any treasury funding to avoid a bailout. the agency is increasi fees and making other changes. >> based on all of that do you expect a taxpayer bailout as we sit here today? if so, when? >> based on those steps i believe we've,
of oil up? more problems in syria? we'll talk about that in a minute? would it be chinese demand? palestinian-israeli conflict? what will be the black swan event in oil? >> i think we're becoming numb what happens in the middle east until they rattle their sabre about closing down the straits. seems the u.s. is numb about the news coming out of the moo e. i don't knoy the middle east all by itself will get the rally going. you will have demand coming this year. remember we had hurricane sandy right around a busy driving season, wipe out so many people they couldn't even get in their cars to drive if the cars still worked. whole northeast coast if you ask me took down a lot of gasoline usage which should pick up come the new year. i'm expecting prices will move to their seasonal 1010 sis on the upside and then back down. other thing you have if you're a technical trader a huge head and shoulders bearish formation in the crude market. gasoline of course is by-product of crude. the crude came down from the head and shoulders formation and took the price of gasoline with it as it's a
, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> president obama this week warned the president of syria, bashar al-assad not to use syria's chemical weapons against his own people. rebel syrians are waging an offensive against other syrians, largely assad's government forces. unnamed u.s. officials say that syria has even gone so far as to load the precursor ingredients of sarin, a deadly nerve gas, into the aerial bombs. whether this activity is to protect the chemicals from advancing rebel forces, or for assad to actually use them against rebel forces, is not clear. as secretary of state hillary clinton points out. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons or might lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> syria automatically denies it intends to use chemical weapons against its its own peo whether rebel or nonrebel, quote. syria stresses again, for the 10th, the 100th time, that if we had such weapons, they would not be used against its people. we would people. whether suicide. we fear t
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